Are Zero Commission Rates Good?

Schwab dropped a bombshell on Tuesday when they announced they’ll reduce commission rates on stocks, ETFs, and options to zero! Not to be outdone, TD Ameritrade and E*Trade quickly followed suit. As a result of the announcement, Schwab’s stock fell 14%, TD Ameritrade slumped 28%, and E*Trade plunged 19%. The loss of trading commissions will result in a significant drop in revenue for these firms. Their pain is your gain.

Trading with zero commission reminds me of a visit to an all-you-can-eat buffet. Walking into a buffet is exciting when you see the endless sea of culinary delights. On your first pass through the buffet line, you pile your plate high with a wide variety of food items. You know it’s not a good idea to make a fifth trip through the buffet line, but you need to try several desserts before you leave. Eating at all-you-can-eat buffets will have harmful consequences on your health as will excessive trading on your wealth.

Now that commission-free trading has gone mainstream, this may entice individuals to trade more often, and more trading is not good. During the internet boom, Morgan Stanley introduced a commission-free trading account called Choice. Clients paid a fee based on the level of their assets. As a branch manager, I reviewed accounts and trades. One of our clients was trading more than 200 times a month, and it wasn’t going well. She was not a good trader, incurring significant losses. The losses didn’t detour her because she felt empowered to trade by not paying commissions on each trade.

An unfortunate byproduct of excessive trading is short-term capital gains. Short-term capital gain rates are much higher than long-term capital gain rates because they’re taxed as ordinary income. Another potential issue is the wash rule. The wash rule disallows a loss if you buy or sell the same security within 31 days before or after your trade.

Warren Buffett, Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Mark Zuckerberg are billionaires because of their stellar business skills and the excellent performance of their company stock. A significant portion of their wealth has come from sitting, not trading. Most of the time, they’re doing nothing with their shares. Do you think Bill Gates and Warren Buffett day trade their accounts? LOL.

Commission rates were deregulated on May 1, 1975. With commission rates no longer fixed, Wall Street firms were now able to set their own rates. Charles Schwab (the person) launched his firm as a result of the new rule, and a revolution was born.[1] Commission rates have been low for years, and some firms already offer free trades through zero-fee trading on ETFs.

Long-term wealth is created by being patient, and one of the best ways to increase your wealth is to buy and hold a globally diversified portfolio of low-cost mutual funds.

As commissions drop, how can you take advantage of lower rates and fees? Here are a few ideas.

  • Move your account to a custodian currently offering zero-rates for trading like TD Ameritrade, Schwab, or E*Trade.
  • Most registered investment advisors work with a custodian to handle client accounts. Make sure your advisor uses one of the custodians from above.
  • Hire a Certified Financial Planner® with low fees, ideally well below the industry standard of 1% of your assets.
  • Conduct a fee audit on your accounts. Brokers post their charges, and advisors list theirs in their ADV. A Certified Financial Planner® can help you review your statements to make sure your costs are low.
  • Hire a firm that offers financial planning in addition to investment management. The financial plan should be included in the fee you’re being assessed to manage your assets
  • Avoid manufactured products like annuities or permanent life insurance. These insurance products have substantial fees and deferred sales charges, meaning if you sell your investment early, you’ll incur heavy penalties.

Are zero commission rates good? Lower rates are a boon to investors. The less you pay, the more you keep. However, there’s no free lunch, so read the small print to find out how your firm makes money.

 “I have the right to do anything,” you say—but not everything is beneficial. “I have the right to do anything”—but not everything is constructive.  No one should seek their own good, but the good of others. ~ 1 Corinthians 10:23-24

October 3, 2019

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA® is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose. Our firm does not have an asset or fee minimum, and we work with anybody who needs financial help regardless of age, income, or asset level. PWM’s custodian is TD Ameritrade and our annual fee starts at .5% of your assets and drops depending on the level of your assets.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation. Options involve risk and aren’t suitable for every investor.

 

 

 

 

 

[1] https://www.wsj.com/articles/charles-schwab-ending-online-trading-commissions-on-u-s-listed-products-11569935983, By Alexander Osipovich and Lisa Beilfuss, October 1, 2019

 

50 Days or 50 Years?

The summer season started 50 days ago, and 50 years ago, Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. One short-term, one long.

Traders are short-term focused, and they use a bevy of indicators to try to gain an edge. One of their tools is the moving average. What is a moving average? Here is a definition from Investopedia: “A moving average (MA) is a widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random short-term price fluctuations. It is a trend-following, or lagging, indicator because it is based on past prices.” Since it’s a trend following system, traders will try to ride it for as long as possible.

Traders can focus on several moving averages – 10, 20, 30, 50, 100, or 200 days. When an index trades above its moving average, it’s considered a bullish sign for it to climb higher. When the index dips below it, traders consider it a bearish sign that the market will fall further.

Traders and commentators love to focus on a moving average as a key indicator of short-term moves in the market because it’s an easy indicator to follow. When the index crosses above the moving average, buy. When it dips below, sell. It sounds so simple.

Here’s a look at the most recent 50-day moving average for the S&P 500.

^SPX_chart

Currently, the S&P 500 is trading below it’s 50-day moving average. Should you sell? If you bought the index 50 days ago when the index was trading above the moving average, you’d be down 1.2% if you held on through yesterday’s close. In the past 50 days, the index has crossed through its 50-day moving average six different times.

Traders also rely on the Golden Cross and Death Cross. The Golden Cross occurs when the 50-day crosses above the 200-day, a bullish sign. The Death Cross occurs when the 50-day crosses through the 200-day and falls below it, an extremely bearish signal.

Should you trade the moving averages? If you’re a disciplined short-term trader, it may give you an edge. However, stocks and indices move through their moving averages constantly so you may get whipsawed by the numerous buy and sell signals.  And which indicator should you follow? A 10-day indicator will give a different signal than the 200-day moving average.

A buy and hold investor can save time and stress by ignoring the moving averages. Rather than looking for trading indicators, focus your efforts on identifying your financial goals so you can take advantage of the long-term trend of the stock market.

Fifty years ago, the S&P 500 closed at 93.94. This past Friday the index closed at 2,918.65 – a gain of 3,006%! If you tried to trade each move through the moving average, your returns probably would’ve been a lot less.

^SPX_chart (2)

The long-term trend of the market is hard to beat, but it hasn’t been a straight line. It has been littered with violent moves. The index has fallen 30% or more seven times since 1969, or about 1 in every 7 years. From September 2000 to February 2013 the index traded flat. Investors who grew frustrated with 13 years of poor performance and sold their holdings missed a 93% return from 2013 to 2019.

Is it better to focus on a short-term trading strategy or concentrate on a long-term buy and hold model? I prefer the buy and hold model. Here are a few suggestions to help you answer your own question.

  • If you need the money in one year or less, keep your assets in short-term vehicles like CDs, Treasury Bills, or money market funds.
  • If your money is earmarked for something like paying for college or buying a new home, then keep your money in short-term investments regardless of the time frame. For example, if you plan to buy a new home in three years, then your money should be kept in short-term, conservative investments.
  • If you want to try your hand at short-term trading, limit your risk capital to 3% to 5% of your investable assets. If you’re successful, it will enhance your returns. If you’re not, it won’t bring financial ruin.
  • If your time horizon is 3 to 5 years or more, invest in stocks.
  • Work with a Certified Financial Planner® to help you identify and quantify your goals.

Timing the market is extremely difficult regardless of the indicator you choose. Rather than trying to time the market, spend time focusing on your financial goals.

We don’t really look at the stock, you know. Because for us, it’s about the long term. And so, we’re very much focused on long-term shareholder value but not the short-term kind of stuff. ~ Tim Cook


August 11, 2019

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA® is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose. Our firm does not have an asset or fee minimum, and we work with anybody who needs financial help regardless of age, income, or asset level.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation. Options involve risk and aren’t suitable for every investor.

Dry Powder

Active stock traders need to keep some dry powder so they can buy stocks when the stock market falls. Dry powder usually means cash. Allocating a portion of your portfolio to cash will be a drag on your returns, especially in a low interest rate environment with a rising stock market.

Traders need to be nimble so they can pounce on stocks when they drop. A cash hoard gives them the opportunity to act quickly without selling another position. This strategy works well when stocks fall, and they act on their impulse. If they time their purchase correctly, they can make a lot of money. Of course, if they don’t act quickly or time their purchase correctly, their strategy is for not. In a stock picker’s market cash is needed.

Traders look for fallen angels and Boeing is a classic example. Due to their unfortunate tragedies, the stock has dropped from its high of $440. Traders felt that Boeing below $400 was a bargain. The stock went through $400 like a hot knife through butter, falling another $62 to $338. Traders took their dry powder to buy it at $400 only to see their investment fall 15%.

Timing the market is extremely difficult. According to one study, asset allocation accounts for 93.6% of your investment return with the remaining 6.4% attributed to market timing and investment selection.[1]

During the fourth quarter of 2018 the Dow Jones fell 12.5% and investors withdrew $183 billion in mutual fund assets. Investors were storing up some dry powder, I guess. This year investors have added $21 billion to mutual funds, or 11.5% of what they took out last year. Meanwhile, the Dow has risen 13.8%. Dry powder?

A better strategy for most investors is to own a portfolio of low-cost index funds, diversified across asset classes, sectors and countries. This portfolio will give you exposure to thousands of securities doing different things at different times. It will allow you to stay fully invested because you never know when, where, why, or how the stock market will take off. It reduces your risk of market timing and eliminates the cash drag on your performance.

But what if, or when, the market falls? In a balanced portfolio you will own bonds of different maturities. For example, during the Great Recession stocks fell 56%. Long-term bonds were up 16.6% while intermediate bonds stayed steady at 2.94%. Dimensional Fund Advisors Five-Year Global Fixed Income fund rose 4.9%. True, they did not offset the entire drop-in stocks, but they did hold their own.

It’s possible, and recommended, to rebalance an index portfolio on a regular basis. When your asset allocation changes, rebalance your portfolio to return it to its original allocation. This strategy allows you to buy low and sell high on a regular basis. I once heard an advisor compare rebalancing to getting your haircut. When your hair gets too long, cut it back to its original length.

Shouldn’t stock pickers make money in a stock picker’s market? According to Morningstar only 24% of active equity mutual fund money managers beat their passive index over a 10-year period.[2] Is it possible to pick the top quartile funds every year for the next ten years? Doubtful.

Dimensional Fund Advisor’s found that over a 20-year period only 42% of equity funds survived. Their database started with 2,414 funds and only 1,013 survived twenty years. If more than half the funds fail, how will you be able to pick the top 25%?[3]

Rather than keeping dry powder or trying to time the market, focus on your financial goals and invest in a balanced portfolio of low-cost index funds.

Don’t let dry powder blow up your portfolio!

My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style. ~ Maya Angelou

June 19, 2019

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA® is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation.

 

 

 

 

[1] Determinants of Portfolio Performance, Financial Analyst Journal, July/August 1986, Vol 42, No. 4, 6 pages; Gary P. Brinson, L. Randolph Hood, Gilbert L. Beebower.

[2] https://office.morningstar.com/research/doc/911724/U-S-Active-Passive-Barometer-7-Takeaways-from-the-2018-Report, Ben Johnson, February 7, 2019

[3] file:///C:/Users/parro/Downloads/2019%20Mutual%20Fund%20Landscape_%20Report.pdf

Better Off Dead?

Dr. Daniel Crosby is the author of The Behavioral Investor. In his book he highlights a story about Fidelity Investments and their attempt to identify their best performing retail accounts. They found that the individuals who owned these accounts had forgotten they existed, or the original account owner had passed away.[1] Fidelity was probably looking for an investment theme to duplicate. However, they discovered that these accounts weren’t being traded or tainted by human hands – living or deceased.

He tells of another story from the book Behavioral Investment Management: An Efficient Alternative to Modern Portfolio Theory written by Greg B. Davies and Arnaud de Servigny. The authors discuss a study about how often people check their investment accounts and their corresponding performance. They found that people who check their account balances daily experienced a loss 41% of the time. Individuals who checked their balances every five years experienced a loss about 12% of the time and those who checked it every 12 years never lost money.[2]

Stocks have never lost money during a rolling 20-year period according to multiple studies. From 1926 to 2018 there have been 74 rolling 20-year periods and stocks have made money 100% of the time.[3] The most recent period, 1998-2018, finished with a positive return. An investment in the SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) on 1/1/1998 generated an average annual return of 7.10% through 1/1/2018. However, during this 20-year period you would’ve experienced significant losses on several occasions. From 2000 to 2002 the market fell 43.07% and in 2008 it dropped 36.81%. As I mentioned, if you checked your balances daily, your chance of a realized loss was high.[4]

It’s hard to ignore your accounts especially if you’re connected to Twitter, Facebook, and other social media sites. Custodians and brokerage firms also have apps allowing you to check your accounts 24/7. Investment firms offer trading alerts and other notices to keep you in the know. It’s a fast-paced world and reacting to headline news stories may wreak havoc to your long-term wealth.

To protect your wealth from irrational reactions turnoff your account alerts and notices. Rather than reviewing your balances daily, try extending it to a month, then three months, and so on. Extending the time frame for reviewing your accounts will reduce your anxiety and potentially increase your returns.

You don’t have to die to generate solid returns. Rather, incorporate a buy and hold investment strategy with a balanced portfolio of low-cost investments. A diversified portfolio of low-cost mutual funds will reduce your dependence to constantly check your accounts. In doing so you’ll be able to enjoy your life while you’re living.

And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one. ~ Matthew 6:13

February 11, 2019

Bill Parrott is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog.

 

[1] The Behavioral Investor by Daniel Crosby, Ph.D. – Kindle Edition, location 2673, accessed 2/10/19.

[2] Greg B. Davies, Behavioral Investment Management: An Efficient Alternative to Modern Portfolio Theory (McGraw-Hill, 2012), p. 53. The Behavioral Investor by Daniel Crosby, Ph.D. – Kindle Edition, location 1423, accessed 2/10/19.

[3] Ibbotson® SBBI® 2015 Classic Yearbook

[4] Morningstar Office Hypothetical – SPY, 1/01/1198 to 1/1/2018.

What is the S&P 500?

What did the market do today? Was it up? Down? When people refer to the “the market” it’s usually the S&P 500® Index. But what is it? It’s a key benchmark money managers, mutual funds, and other professionals use to measure performance.

The S&P 500® Index is a collection of the 500 largest publicly traded U.S. corporations. It’s a market weighted index meaning the largest companies have the greatest impact on performance – good and bad.  The largest company in the index is Microsoft; the smallest is News Corp. When Microsoft moves, so will the index. The 10 largest companies in the index are Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, Facebook, Johnson & Johnson, JP Morgan Chase, Alphabet, Exxon Mobil, and Bank of America. The largest sectors are Information Technology, Healthcare and Financials.

Standard & Poor’s launched the now famous index on March 4, 1957. It’s a better gauge of the market because of the breadth of its holdings especially when compared to the Dow Jones Industrial Average which only holds 30 companies.[1] The Dow Jones index was founded in May 1896.

Because of the breadth and consistency over time there are currently $9.9 trillion in assets linked to this index. The most popular one is the Vanguard S&P 500 Index Fund founded by Mr. John Bogle. Mr. Bogle recently passed away and this put a spotlight on this popular category. Mr. Bogle started the fund in 1976 to a less than stellar opening. His goal was to raise $150 million but he only received $11.4 million – a rounding error on Wall Street.[2] The fund currently has assets of $400 billion! If you had invested $10,000 in this fund when it opened, your account balance would be worth $744,951 today. It has generated an average annual return of 10.71% since its feeble beginning.

Wall Street was not a fan of Mr. Bogle’s fund because of its low fee structure and average returns. What investor would want to own a fund generating average returns when active fund managers and stock pickers could do so much better? Makes sense. However, active stock pickers rarely outperform the S&P 500® Index. In fact, 91% of active fund managers failed to outperform the S&P 500® over a 10-year period and 95% of funds with high fees lagged this key benchmark. The active managers were below average, well below.[3]

Rather than average returns consider market returns. If you can generate market returns over time, your wealth should grow despite the occasional drop in value or spike in volatility. A low cost, diversified investment like the Vanguard S&P 500® Index Fund is a great candidate for most investors.

As a side note, the S&P 500 owns 505 companies!

Happy Investing.

“The two greatest enemies of the equity fund investor are expenses and emotions.” ~ John C. Bogle

February 1, 2019

Bill Parrott is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog.

 

 

 

[1] file:///C:/Users/Bill%20Parrott/Downloads/fs-sp-500.pdf

[2] https://www.inc.com/magazine/201210/eric-schurenberg/how-i-did-it-john-bogle-the-vanguard-group.html, B Eric Schurenberg, 9/25/2012

[3] https://office.morningstar.com/research/doc/Aug%2023%202018_Active_vs_Passively_Managed_Funds_Takeaways_from_Our_Mid-Year_Report__880196, Ben Johnson, August 23, 2018

Who Cares?

Who cares that the current bull market has risen more than 260% when stocks have dropped 7% in the past month? Does it matter that stocks have generated an average annual return of 10% for the past 100 years or markets rise 75% of the time when this year will be negative? Stocks have outpaced bonds and cash for decades, but so what? This year bonds and cash have the upper hand.

The current bull market started on March 9, 2009 after a grueling 17-month bear market. The current recovery is (was) over nine years old – one of the longest recoveries on record.  Did the market go straight up during this historic run? Of course not. It was littered with several corrections.

During this bull market, the Dow Jones experienced 68 days when it fell 2% or more and 45% of the time it produced a return of 0% or worse. The average daily gain has been .06% – yawn.

Here is a year by year look at this bull market.

2009 – After the bull market started, it dropped 7.42%. It finished the year up 18.82%.

2010 – During this year the market fell 7.6%, 13.5% and 5.12%. It finished the year up 11.02%.

2011 – During this year the market fell 6.28%, 7.12%, 16.26%, and 8.17%. It finished the year up 5.53%.

2012 – During this year the market fell 8.87% and 7.75%. It finished the year up 7.26%.

2013 – During this year the market fell 4.86%, 5.6%, and 5.75%. It finished the year up 26.50%.

2014 – During this year the market fell 13.75%, 4.5%, 6.64%, and 4.95%. It finished the year up 7.52%.

2015 – During this year the market fell 14.44%. It finished the year down 2.23%.

2016 – During this year the market fell 10.12%. It finished the year up 13.42%.

2017 – During this year the market fell 1.9% – a mild year. It finished the year up 25.08%.

2018 – This year the market has fallen 11.58%, 4.75%, and 12%. The year isn’t over yet!

As you can see, this bull market experienced significant drops, but it always recovered. Will this time be different? Who knows? Time will tell.

Here are a few suggestions if you’re concerned about the recent market volatility.

  1. If you need money in the next one, two or three years, do not invest it in the stock market. Rather, invest in a money market fund, CD or U.S. Treasury Bill.
  2. If the market is keeping you up at night, your allocation to stocks is too high. Sell your stocks to your comfort level.
  3. Work on your financial plan. Your plan will determine your asset allocation based on your goals. If your plan, goals, and asset allocation are aligned, you’re more likely to stay invested through good times and bad.
  4. Time the market. Sell at the top; buy at the bottom. Just kidding. No one has been able to consistently time the market, but who knows, you may be the one to do it.

These past three months have been brutal. The market downturn has turned a decent year into a poor one. This happens occasionally. During the next two weeks spend some time reviewing your goals. If they’re still intact, stay the course.

People who succeed in the stock market also accept periodic losses, setbacks, and unexpected occurrences. Calamitous drops do not scare them out of the game. ~ Peter Lynch

December 18, 2018

Bill Parrott is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management firm located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process to help our clients pursue a life of purpose.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog.

 

Source: YCharts. Year by year data does not include dividends.

 

Photo Credit: Victor Brave

 

 

 

 

Slow Money

CNBC’s Fast Money is “America’s post-market show to bring you the actionable news that matters most to investors.” The panel of traders discuss stocks, ETF’s, options, and bitcoin. They talk in technical terms and use graphs and charts to highlight their main points. They sound convincing and make it look easy as if all you had to do was buy a stock after it bounces off the 200-day moving average and ride it until it hits resistance where you can sell it for a tidy profit.

Trading is like a sporting event with winners and losers. It’s also profitable to brokerage firms and exchanges. The more you trade, the more money they make. If they make more, you make less.

When you trade you’ll be competing against professionals and large Wall Street firms capitalized with trillions of dollars. Your emotional behavior will have a huge impact on your trading success more so than professional traders. Will you be able to set strict trading rules? How will you react when your stock breaks the 200-day moving average and falls 20% in a single trading session? Will you sell it? Will you buy more convinced that you’re correct and that everybody else is wrong? Will you sit on your loss hoping it rebounds to your purchase price? Day traders in J.C. Penny (JCP), Sears Holdings (SHLDQ), and GE are still waiting. Did you notice the “Q” in the Sears symbol? It represents bankruptcy.

What if you want to trade the market? If you want to commit your hard-earned dollars to trading, limit it to 2% to 3% of the money invested in your taxable account. Do not trade in your IRA because you can’t write off your losses.

Let’s look at three different companies – Company A, B and C. All three have different chart patterns. Company A is rising and trading at all-time highs. Company B is in a free fall trading near historical lows. Company C is in a holding pattern and it appears to be building a base. Which stock would you buy? Which one looks more appealing?

 

AMZN A

 

AMZN B

 

 AMZN C

Company A is Amazon from June 1, 1997 to July 31, 1998 not long after it launched its IPO. The stock rose 1,100% during this window.

Company B is Amazon from November 1, 1999 to October 31, 2001 where it fell 92%. Amazon was hit hard during the tech-wreck.

Company C is Amazon from July 1, 2004 to March 31, 2007 where it gained 2.2%. It’s hard to believe, but for about three years the stock barely budged.

The best time to have bought Amazon was after it fell 92%, as it did in chart B. If you had the courage to buy at the low, you would’ve made over 23,000%! In hindsight it appears easy, but if you bought it in 2001, you would have endured 19 different months where it dropped 10% or more. Its worst monthly drop occurred in July 2004, falling 31%. It takes courage, conviction and luck to time the market.

Is there a better way? A slow money strategy based on your financial goals and dreams can treat you well over time. A financial planner can design a portfolio of low cost, globally diversified mutual funds based on your objectives. This strategy can minimize your investing mistakes and costs, allowing you to keep more of what you earn.  Your plan will help you prioritize the things that are most important to you and your family allowing you to grow your wealth across generations.

Short term trading with fast money can be detrimental to your long-term wealth, so go slow instead!

It doesn’t matter how slow you go so long as you do not stop. ~ Confucius

11/7/2018

Bill Parrott is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog.

 

 

When to Sell A Stock?

A few high-flying growth stocks came crashing back to earth after posting poor earnings. Facebook fell 21%, Netflix dropped 19%, and Twitter cratered 27%.  In the days leading up to the Facebook announcement, it rose 4.5% to close at an all-time high of $218.62. If investors knew it was going to collapse, they would’ve shorted the stock or bought puts to profit from the drop.

Facebook went public in May 2012 at $38 per share. It has returned 354% for investors, or 27.5% per year from its initial public offering. However, after a few days of trading it fell 25% and by Labor Day it had dropped more than 50%. In Fact, Barron’s Magazine gave it a thumb’s down in their September 24, 2012 issue with a price target of $15.[1] It never hit $15 per share and since the article appeared Facebook has risen 1,050%!

Facebook has had double digit losses in each year it has been a publicly traded company. If you sold it on every wiggle, twitch, or flutter, you’d never make any money. A buy and hold investor has probably made the most money in this stock if she’s been able to ignore the volatility.

As a stock gyrates, how do you know if it’s the beginning of the end or a temporary pause in an upward trend? How do you know when it’s the right time to sell?  Here are a few suggestions.

Allocation. If your single stock holding is more than 25% of your portfolio, it’s a good time to sell and diversify your assets. A 3% to 5% allocation to a single stock is recommended.

Price Target. If your stock hits your pre-determined price target, take your gain. If you buy a company at $15 per share with a price target of $20, take your profits if it trades to your mark.

Ratios. A rising stock is fun to own. As it climbs, keep an eye on the key ratios like price to earnings, price to sales, and price to book. The higher the level of the ratios, the lower the future performance of your stock may be. Comparing current and historical ratios is advised. You can view this data in Morningstar, Value Line, or Yahoo! Finance.  Netflix stock price soared 126% in less than a year and despite the recent 20% drop, it still trades at a price to earnings ratio of 125, well above historical norms.

Balance Sheet.  A company with negative cash flows or high debt levels should be avoided. If it’s cutting or eliminating its dividend, it’s a good candidate to sell. Tesla has been a polarizing stock for a decade and since 2008 it has had (growing) negative cash flows.

Goals. Your financial goals may change over time. If your account value has increased and you want to preserve your assets, sell some of your stock holdings and buy bonds. This will reduce your stock exposure and risk level.

Taxes. If you have realized gains, sell stocks with a loss to offset the gains. If you have realized losses, take gains. You can offset gains and losses dollar for dollar.

Timing. Selling a stock at an all-time high is always preferred. However, it’s better to buy at the right price, but this is hard to do because the stock is probably in a slumber or hitting new lows. The best time to have bought Facebook was September 4, 2012 at $17.73 after it had fallen 53%. Obvious today, but it would’ve been a difficult purchase at the time because it was engulfed in negative news as evident by the Barron’s article. It was also a new platform not known to many. If you have the courage to buy a stock that everyone hates, you may be rewarded over time.

A strategy I recommend is to purchase a basket of low-cost mutual funds giving you exposure to thousands of companies. A globally diversified portfolio of mutual funds will free you from making any buy and sell decisions allowing you to focus on your long-term goals.

You get recessions, you have stock market declines. If you don’t understand that’s going to happen, then you’re not ready, you won’t do well in the markets. ~ Peter Lynch


August 1, 2018

Bill Parrott is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management firm located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog. Please consult your CPA or tax advisor before implementing any of these strategies to see if it makes sense for your situation.

[1] https://www.barrons.com/articles/SB50001424053111904706204578002652028814658, Andrew Bary, 9/24/2012.