My Fee Is Better Than Your Fee

Advisors, brokers, planners, bloggers, vloggers, Fin Twit experts, and other pontificators are praising the benefits of their own fee models while bashing all others. Strong opinions about whose fee schedule is best is a common thread. At the end of the day, however, a fee is a fee regardless of how it’s charged.

Firms may combine fee platforms or institute pricing tiers with minimum fees. For example, advisors may bill you hourly for their financial planning services while charging you an asset management fee.

One of my clients has been hounded by a stockbroker who has been trying to sell her an annuity. He told her the purchase would not cost her anything. After some research, I found out that he was going to receive a 5% commission.

Several years ago, an insurance agent approached me about buying a whole life insurance policy with an annual premium of $100,000. I was also told I wouldn’t incur any out of pocket expenses or fees. He was going to make $55,000 if I had purchased the policy.

If a broker tells you it won’t cost anything, you’re probably going to get fleeced.

Fees are confusing, especially if they’re called something else. It’s all semantics. Here’s a guide to help you navigate the murky waters of fees. This will help you identify the various types you might incur when you’re meeting with a financial professional or reviewing your account statements.

Commissions. If you buy or sell a stock, a commission will be added to or deducted from your trade. Bonds will also trade with a commission ranging from $1 to $30 per bond. If you purchase 100 bonds ($100,000) and you’re charged $10 per bond, your fee will be $1,000. This is referred to as a markup or markdown. Exchange traded funds and options will also trade with a commission. The more your broker trades, the more commissions they’ll earn.

Front End Load. Mutual funds with a front-end load will have commission rates ranging from 1% to 5% or more and it will be deducted from your purchase. If you invest $100,000 into a fund with a 4% front-end load, your fee will be $4,000, so $96,000 will be invested. The most common type of front-end loaded mutual fund is referred to as an “A” share.

Back End Load or Deferred Sales Charge. Funds and annuities with a deferred sales charge will charge a fee if you liquidate early. A declining sales charge is applied based on the number of years you own your holding. A fund may have deferred sales charge that declines over five years where 5% is deducted the first year, 4% the second year, 3% the third year and so on. If you invest $100,000 into a fund with a deferred sales charge and you sell it in year three, the fund company will deduct 3%, or $3,000 from your proceeds. The most common share class with back end loads are “B” and “C” shares.

Wrap. A wrap account will charge a percentage based on your investment but not charge a commission for your trades because the commissions are wrapped into the fee. Wrap accounts are popular with brokerage firms. They’ll offer you an investment account that owns 50 to 70 stocks or more. Depending on the size of your investment, you may own 2 to 3 shares of a company and If you were paying commissions, the fees could climb quickly. I worked for a large brokerage firm several years ago and our wrap-fee program charged clients 3% per year – an extremely high fee.

AUM. The asset under management fee model is popular with Registered Investment Advisors. An advisor may charge you a fee of 1% on the assets they manage on your behalf. The fee drops with the more assets you have under management.

Retainer. A retainer fee model will give you access to an advisor or planner for a specific project or timeframe, but it may not include managing your assets. It’s similar to an a la carte menu at a restaurant.

Flat Fee.  Your fee is flat, or fixed, regardless of your asset level. This model favors large accounts and punishes smaller ones. Advisors will charge a flat fee for financial planning and investment management services. This fee differs from the retainer model because the relationship is intended to be long-term.

Hourly. This model works well if you want a limited scope offering or a one-time analysis like a second opinion. It also appeals to investors who want to pick their own investments but want guidance with their asset allocation or financial plan. Advisors may charge $250 to $500 per hour to create a financial plan, review your investments, or give you guidance on a special project.

Subscription. This is a relatively new model primarily aimed at millennials or high-income earners with little assets. A fee is charged based on your income or net worth and it’s billed monthly, like a car payment. Services may include budgeting, cash flow planning, debt reduction, 401(k) guidance, and investment selection.

Hedge Fund. Hedge funds typically have a 2 and 20 model. They’ll charge you 2% on your assets and receive 20% of your trading profits. For example, if you invest $1,000,000 and it grows to $2,000,000, your hedge fund will earn 2% on $2,000,000 and receive $40,000 in fees. They’ll also earn $200,000 on your trading profits.

Regardless of where or how you purchase a mutual fund, exchange traded fund or annuity, they’ll have ongoing fees and expenses. Mutual funds and ETF’s have operating expenses (OER) and the fees vary wildly. Mutual funds may also have a 12b-1 fee, charging you another .25% on top of the OER. An annuity has fees for mortality, riders, administration, and investments – to name a few. Annuity fees can climb to 3% or more. Individual stocks, bonds and options do not have ongoing fees or expenses after they’re purchased.

Fees come in all types of flavors, so pick one that works well for you and your family. If you’re concerned about fees, then open an account at T.D. Ameritrade, Fidelity, Vanguard, E*Trade, or Schwab and only buy individual stocks, bonds or low-cost index funds. The commissions and fees will be low so long as you don’t day trade your account.

Fees are important, of course, but it’s more important to work with an advisor you trust. One who puts your interest firsts and acts in a fiduciary capacity is recommended.

What about our fees? We charge .5% ($5 per $1,000) for assets under management which includes a financial plan. Our stand-alone financial planning fee is $800.  Good conversation, fellowship and bad jokes are free.

In the long run, we shape our lives, and we shape ourselves. The process never ends until we die. And the choices we make are ultimately our own responsibility. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt

June 25, 2019

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA® is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation.

 

 

 

 

 

What Are You Doing This Summer?

Summer has arrived and its vacation time! Travelers will be crisscrossing the globe in search of the perfect family vacation. Individuals will spend between 10 to 20 hours researching their vacation.[1] Proper planning will make your vacation more enjoyable.

Deciding where to go is only half the battle. Once you pick a location, then everything else will fall into place. How will you get there? What will you do? Etc. For example, if you’re going to Hawaii this rules out driving. A trip to Death Valley means you won’t be scuba diving.

Early planning can enhance your vacation experience. It will give you more options and potentially better rates. Last minute planning is frustrating. If you wait until the last minute to plan your trip your choices may be limited and more expensive.

Vacations aren’t cheap. The average cost is $1,145 per person, so a family of four can expect to spend $4,580.[2] About a quarter of the population will finance their trip with credit cards, personal loans, or a short-term payday loan.[3] Financing your vacation can add an extra 20% to 25% to your cost.

I love planning – all types. A few years ago, my family and I spent three weeks trekking around Europe by planes, trains and automobiles. It took me a year of planning to work on the logistics. Colored spreadsheets helped me with our travel plans, side trips, dining options, entertainment, and budget. It was one of our best family trips.

National Plan for Vacation day is January 30. According to travel research, they recommend a planning window of two to three months. The same study mentions that Americans leave 662 million unused vacation days on the table each year resulting in a “$236 billion missed opportunity for the U.S. economy.”[4]

Missed vacation days and poor travel planning won’t be detrimental to your family’s future but failing to plan for your financial future will be.

Unfortunately, people spend more time planning their vacation than they do their financial future. If you spent 10 to 20 hours per year on your financial plan, it may have life changing results. In fact, Individuals who complete a financial plan have three times the assets of those individuals who do little or no planning.[5]

Financial planning is not as fun as planning for a family vacation, but it’s necessary, especially if you want to maintain your lifestyle in retirement. Financial planning will give you options. It will give you flexibility. Your plan will confirm your current lifestyle or give you suggestions for changes.

Spending one to two hours per month reviewing your financial status can pay lifetime dividends. Your plan will direct your steps, like a trail map. It will give you a financial destination. Once you determine where you need to go financially, everything will fall into place.  Deciding on how much money you’ll need in retirement is paramount. Here are a few planning tips to get you started.

  1. Take an inventory. What is your current financial situation? Where are your assets? How are they performing? What fees are you paying? In addition, track your expenses. Get a handle on how and where your money is being spent.
  2. Set goals. What do you want to do when you retire? Travel? Setting financial goals is just as important, if not more so, than goals like losing weight or getting in shape. According to the Peak Performance Center, “Your goals give you a clear focus on what you believe to be important in life.” If a goal is important to you, you’ll figure out a way to make it happen.
  3. After taking an inventory and setting goals, it’s time to prioritize your list. Your list might be long, so spend some time culling it. Reduce your list to three to five items you can pursue because too many goals may lead to inertia.
  4. After you’ve figured out what you have and what you want to do, put it to work. Activate your plan. Once your plan is up and running, then you can spend a few hours a month reviewing and tweaking it as needed.
  5. Hire a planner. If you’re not comfortable creating and implementing your plan, hire a Certified Financial Planner®. A CFP professional will help you quantify and prioritize your goals. In addition to developing your plan, they’ll act as your accountability partner. Hire a planner with the CFP® designation who works for an independent Registered Investment Advisory firm, is fee-only, and acts in a fiduciary (best-interest) capacity. You can search for an advisor in your area on these websites: feeonlynetwork.com, www.napfa.org, or www.cfp.net.

Your financial plan can give you a lifetime of vacations if you plan accordingly. It will free you to enjoy your trips. Don’t wait. Start planning today.

Enjoy your summer and safe travels!

No matter what happens, travel gives you a story to tell. ~ Jewish Proverb

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA® is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation.

 

[1] https://www.vacationkids.com/vacations-with-kids/how-much-time-does-it-take-to-research-and-plan-a-family-vacation, Sally Black, June 20, 2017

[2] https://www.creditdonkey.com/average-cost-vacation.html, Kim P, October 8, 2018

[3] https://www.finder.com/vacation-loan-debt, Website accessed June 19, 2019

[4] https://www.travelagentcentral.com/running-your-business/stats-less-than-half-americans-take-time-to-plan-vacation-days, Newsdesk, January 29, 2018. Website accessed June 19, 2019.

[5] http://www.nber.org/papers/w17078

Financial Mystery Dinners

Murder mystery dinners are popular. At these dinners’ guests try to guess who committed the crime based on a series of clues. Guests are also part of the show and may be prime suspects. You might have attended one of these events in the past, but have you ever been to a financial mystery dinner?

Let’s say you’re invited to a financial mystery dinner to solve a financial crime. The storyline is that four of the guests will run out of money in retirement. Why four?

According to The Employee Benefit Research Institute, 40.6% of households are projected to run out of money in retirement.[1] They have been conducting this survey since 2003 and the numbers are grim, especially for single women.

In another study from the World Economic Forum, they found that men could outlive their savings by 8 years and 11 years for women.[2]

The Federal Reserve estimates the average retirement account balance is $60,000.[3]  If your IRA balance is $60,000, you can expect an annual income of $2,400 – before taxes!

If you depleted your savings and had to rely solely on Social Security, the average monthly benefit is $1,345 or $16,248 per year.[4]

Here are the guests. Can you identify which four will run out of money during their retirement?

Marty Millennial. He’s a young man living at home. He earns a decent salary but keeps his money in a low yielding savings account at a major bank. He reluctantly contributes 2% of his salary to his 401(k) plan.

Tammy Teacher. Tammy has been an elementary school teacher for several years. She contributes to a 403(b) plan and she’ll receive a pension payment from her state when she retires. Her husband is a firefighter who will also receive a state pension.

Sandy Salesman. Sandy is a hard charging salesman who drives a Ferrari and wears a gold Rolex watch. He’s self-employed, has a small IRA, and changes jobs every 1 to 3 years to pursue a larger sales territory with better leads.

Robby Retiree. Robby has been retired for a few years. He and his wife love to eat out and travel. They own a large home, live on a golf course, and drive a Range Rover. He has an IRA and a few investment accounts. He’ll receive Social Security in two years. His wife was a homemaker and she’ll receive spousal benefits from Social Security when Robby files for his benefits.

Donna Doctor. Donna is a surgeon at a huge hospital in a major city. She graduated from medical school with several thousand dollars’ worth of student loans. She is a high-income earner who works long, stressful shifts.

Peter Pilot. Peter is a pilot for a major airline. He’s been flying for about 15 years. His airline offers a pension, but he is concerned about the financial stability of his employer. He knows the sad history of airline carriers going bankrupt. He’s now a first officer. He has three kids and they all participate in club soccer.

Linda Lawyer. Linda is a trial lawyer. She and her husband have two daughters who are about to get married. Her firm has generous benefits including profit-sharing and cash balance plans. Her husband is a staff accountant for a local municipality.

Danny Developer. Danny is a computer programmer for a high-tech company. He’s paid handsomely for his coding skills and he’s been rewarded with stock options and restricted stock. His company will go public this year.

Ashley Athlete. Ashley is a professional soccer player for a team located on the East Coast. Her salary isn’t great, but she earns extra income from endorsements and coaching soccer clinics.

Frank Farmer. Frank owns a farm in Texas on several thousand acres. He grows corn and wheat and earns a decent living from his crops. He and his wife have four children and seven grandchildren. His family will have an estate tax issue when Frank and his wife pass away.

How did you do? Which four guests will run out of money? Of course, there’s no way to know with the limited clues given, so time will tell. However, here are a few things you can incorporate today to improve your odds of enjoying a successful retirement.

  • Invest for growth. Over time, stocks outperform bonds and cash by a wide margin. Stocks do carry risk, but not bigger than the risk of running out of money in retirement. If you invested $10,000 in stocks ten years ago, it would be worth $26,220 today. The same amount invested in short-term bonds would be worth $10,060.
  • Save early and often. The sooner you start saving, the better. Even if you’re going to receive a pension, Social Security, or other guaranteed payouts, you still need to save your money. How much? A suggested amount is 10% to 15% of your annual income.
  • Contribute to your company retirement plan. A 401(k) plan is a great tool for creating wealth, especially if your company offers a match. If you contribute 5% of your income and your company matches 5%, your making 100% on your investment. 401(k) plans are efficient and easy to use. Invest for growth because you won’t be able to touch this money for 10, 20, 30 years or more.
  • Pay off debt. Eliminate high credit card debt, auto-loans, student loans and mortgages before you enter retirement. High levels of debt will be a hindrance to a successful retirement. According to one study, the average debt balance for individuals age 75 or older is $36,757.[5]
  • Create an emergency fund. A cash hoard will help you when trouble hits. It will also allow you to pay for things without using a credit card and accruing more debt. A recommended cash amount is three to six months of household expenses.
  • Develop a spending plan. A spending plan will help you identify how your money is being spent. It will give you an opportunity to reduce, or eliminate, your expenses.
  • Generate a financial plan. A financial plan solves a lot of financial mysteries. It will reveal the clues needed to produce a fruitful retirement. It will give you direction.

Don’t be caught short in retirement. Do all you can today to make sure you have financial assets when it matters most. It would be a crime not to!

Just the facts ma’am. ~ Joe Friday

June 14, 2019

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA® is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation.

 

 

 

[1] https://www.fool.com/retirement/2019/05/19/heres-how-many-us-households-will-run-out-of-money.aspx, Christy Bieber, May 19, 2019

[2] https://www.barrons.com/articles/outlive-retirement-savings-world-eonomic-forum-retiree-global-51560453625?mod=hp_DAY_6, Reshma Kapadia, June 13, 2019

[3] https://smartasset.com/retirement/average-retirement-savings-are-you-normal, Amelia Josephson, April 16, 2019.

[4] Ibid

[5] https://www.cnbc.com/2018/04/04/growing-debt-among-older-americans-threatens-retirement.html, Annie Nova, April 4, 2018

Spend It Like Beckham

A client called recently to let me know he was going to make a major purchase. He wanted to know if his purchase was going to affect his investments. After a few clicks through his financial plan, we determined he could make the purchase and it would not have an impact on his long-term goals. He made the purchase.

Over the years I’ve had several conversations with clients about purchasing big ticket items from cars to boats to planes.  I worked with a gentleman that purchased a sizable apartment in Paris. He had the financial resources to make it happen and the total cost was a fraction of his net worth. Another individual was building a home on an island in the Pacific Northwest. He was going to turn it into a B&B with Ferrari’s and an airplane (he was a former pilot for a major airline.) After completing his financial plan, I told him he couldn’t afford all his purchases. He had to choose between the home, the cars or the plane.

Lately there has been a lot of discussions, blogs and articles about giving up coffee so you can afford a comfortable retirement. It’s unlikely a cup of coffee will derail your retirement, but I get the spirit of the argument. Spending money on coffee or a Cartier watch makes sense if you have the money.

Money is a use asset. It’s designed to buy goods and services. It doesn’t make sense to die with millions of dollars in your bank account. Of course, blindly spending on things can destroy your financial future. So how do you know how much money you can spend? Here are a few thoughts.

Do the math. The stock market is performing well this year, rising 11.5%. A balanced portfolio of 50% stocks and 50% bonds is up 9.4%. If you started the year with a million-dollar portfolio in a balanced account, you’d be up $94,000.  Withdrawing $50,000, $60,000 or $70,000 from your account will not hurt you financially.

More math. If your account is averaging a 5% return every year and your withdrawing 4% from your account, you shouldn’t run out of money. For example, you start with a million-dollar portfolio and withdraw $40,000 for ten years. After ten years you received $400,000 and your account balance is worth $1.125 million. Here’s a real-world example: You invested $1,000,000 in Vanguard’s Balanced Index Fund (VBINX) 25 years ago and withdrew 4% of the account balance each year. After paying taxes and fees, your account balance is worth $2.5 million today, and you received $1.8 million in distributions.[1]

Establish a spending plan. A spending plan, or budget, will help you with your purchasing decisions. Knowing where your money is going is half the battle. Recording your spending habits is a liberating experience.  Setting up a slush fund for impulse items will allow you to make stress free purchases. Your budget will also help you with buying big ticket items. The best place to start for your spending plan is to review your bank and credit card statements for the past 6 months.

Create a financial plan. A financial plan is a difference maker. In addition to reviewing your spending habits, it will incorporate your assets, liabilities, hopes, dreams and fears. Most of my clients have completed a financial plan so when they call to ask if they can make a major purchase, I’m able to answer their question in minutes. Also, when the market is falling like it did in December, I was able to tell clients their financial future was not in peril. A financial plan is paramount if you want to succeed financially.

If you have the money and the resources to buy something, go for it! Spending your money is acceptable, especially if you’ve run the numbers and it falls in line with your budget.

An investment in knowledge pays the best interest. ~ Benjamin Franklin

June 13, 2019

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA® is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation.  This article has nothing to do with David Beckham. I’ve never met him, and I have no idea how he spends his money.

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Morningstar Office Hypothetical – 5/31/1994 – 5/31/2019.

E Ticket

Growing up in Southern California I went to Disneyland often.  In the ‘70s they issued tickets rather than an all-inclusive pass. Their ticket system used letters – A through E, with an E Ticket being the most coveted. They were the most popular and exciting rides like the Matterhorn or Space Mountain.  The ticket book consisted mostly of A tickets with a couple of E tickets. My friends and I would scour the park looking for E Tickets if we ran out of money to buy more. At the end of the night, I’d go home with several A tickets stuffed into the front pocket of my Toughskin jeans

The Matterhorn and Space Mountain were a blast to ride. Rising, falling, and twisting at high speeds is a thrill – but not for everybody. Slow, steady climbs followed by steep and rapid drops aren’t for the faint of heart.

The stock market is like a roller coaster. It’s a slow steady climb punctuated by a few steep and rapid declines. Last year is a perfect example.  From January 1 to October 3 the Dow Jones rose 8.5%. From October 3 to December 24 it fell 18.7%.

The VIX is the volatility, or risk, index and it spiked 210% as the market fell during the fourth quarter of last year. The VIX is currently trading around 16. At 16, it projects a 1% daily move in the stock market. With the Dow currently trading at 26,000 a 1% move means the market can rise or fall 260 points daily.

To calculate how much an index, or stock, can move divide the implied volatility by the square root of 256. What is the square root of 256? It’s 16. Why 256? There are approximately 256 trading days during a calendar year. The current implied volatility of the VIX is 16, 16 divided by the square root of 256 is 1. If implied volatility spikes to 32, then the daily move in the market would be 2%, or 520 points – up or down.

The implied volatility of Apple is about 28, meaning a daily move of 1.75% (28/16). Apple is currently trading for $189, so a 1.75% move is $3.30 – up or down.

Volatility returned to the market in May. From January through April the Dow Jones rose 14% with barely a ripple. In May it fell 6.1% while volatility leaped 26.4%.

Risk, volatility and wealth are intertwined. The stock market carries risk, and therefore you can earn an equity premium, and this is where wealth is created. Since 1926 stocks have risen around 75% of the time, averaging 10%. U.S. T-Bills are safe and have never lost money, however, after taxes and inflation are factored into your returns, they become negative.

How should you handle volatility?

Buy the dip. Stocks rise and fall. When they drop, use it as an opportunity to buy quality stocks or index funds. If you had the courage to buy stocks on Christmas Eve, you would’ve made 19% on your investment.  During the Christmas Eve rout stocks fell 6.3% or about 1,400 points, so buying stocks would’ve required fortitude and grit.

Keep a shopping list. Identify stocks or funds you want to purchase at lower prices and when the market falls it will give you an opportunity to buy some shares.  For example, the price of Apple dropped to $146 in December. It’s now trading at $190 – a gain of 30%.

Automate. Automate your investments to remove emotion from the buying process.  Set up a monthly draft from your bank to your investment account and you’ll be able to dollar cost average into the stock market regardless if it’s up, down or sideways. Investing $100 per month for the past 20 years in the Vanguard S&P 500 index fund is now worth $64,266 – an average annual return of 8.13% per year.

Buy bonds. If you’re concerned about volatility in the stock market, buy bonds. U.S. Government bonds are a great hedge for falling stocks. As stocks fell in May, long-term U.S. Government bonds rose 6.4%. During the market meltdown in 2008 government bonds rose 28%.

Do nothing. Volatility is like turbulence; it will eventually pass. When an airplane hits a turbulent patch, the pilot reminds us to stay seated and tighten our seatbelt. The pilot knows it will be temporary.  Flying is a few moments of fear mixed in with hours of boredom. May is gone and the first week of June is looking good for stocks. In fact, it’s the best weekly performance of the year.

Don’t panic. Investors without a plan sell stocks when the market falls and buy when it rises. When the market isn’t cooperating – sit tight. In December investors withdrew $183 billion from mutual funds as the market fell. When the market rebounded in January and February, they added $43 billion. If you sell when the market is falling, you’ll miss the rebound and the opportunity to generate meaningful long-term gains.

Volatility is part of investing. It is a tool you can use to enhance your returns, if you use it correctly.

Stay in your seat come times of trouble. Its only people who jump off the roller coaster who get hurt. ~ Paul Harvey

June 7, 2019

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA® is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation.

 

 

 

 

Fake News!

Fake News is everywhere, I think. Who knows?

Fake news is on the rise, undermining credible news stories and causing angst. It attacks people, places and things by reporting stories that aren’t true. People shoot first and ask questions later by reacting to false headlines. Online posts, media outlets, and Heads of State rant against the proliferation of fake news stories. If someone doesn’t like a post or news story, they shout: Fake News! With all the data circulating the internet it’s imperative that you spend time separating the wheat from the chaff.

Fake news is alive and well in the investing world. Here are a few examples:

  • I don’t need to save money to accumulate wealth. False. One of the largest components to your wealth creation is how much money you save and invest monthly. How much should you save? A suggested amount is 10% to 15% of your income. If you’re waiting for a lottery ticket, corporate buyout, IPO, or inheritance from a rich uncle, you may be waiting for a long time – possibly forever. Saving $1,000 per month for 30 years will grow to $1.2 million if you can earn 7% on your investment.
  • I can borrow my way to wealth. Debt is an anchor and it will hinder your opportunities to create wealth. The more debt payments you’re making, the less money you can invest. Debt is also a fixed cost and will last the life of your loan. For example, if you borrow $300,000 for 30-years at 4.5%, it will cost you $247,000 in interest.
  • I’m young, I don’t need life insurance. If you’re married with young kids, have a mortgage, a few car loans, and a student loan or two, you need life insurance. How much? At a minimum you’ll need enough to pay off all your debts. If you include the cost for college and survivor income for your spouse, it will add to the amount of life insurance you’ll need. A stay-at-home spouse needs life insurance as well.
  • I’m young so I don’t need to save money until I’m older. Dave Ramsey tells a story about Jack and Blake. Jack is 21 years old and saved $2,400 per year for nine years and then stopped investing. He invested a total of $21,600 and it grew to $2.54 million. Blake, on the other hand, started investing at age 30. He invested $2,400 for 38 years. His total investment of $91,200 grew to $1.48 million. Jack’s nest egg is more than a million dollars greater than Blake’s all because he started when he was young.[1]
  • I’m old, I don’t need to invest for growth. You may live to age 100, or beyond. A person who retires at 65 might spend 35 years in retirement. If you retire your money to a bank or money market fund when you stop working, it will lose value after you factor in inflation and taxes. At a 3% inflation rate, your dollar will lose 35% of it’s value after 35 years – a loss of 1% per year. Contrast this to an investment in Vanguard’s S&P 500 Index Fund on May 29, 1984. A $10,000 investment is now worth $398,000!
  • I can trade my way to prosperity. Day traders, market timers and speculators generate high commissions, short-term tax liabilities, but not wealth. Asset allocation accounts for 93.6% of your investment return. The remaining 6.4% is attributed to market timing and investment selection.[2]
  • I can keep up with the Joneses. Do your friends drive Ferraris and drink Screaming Eagle Cabernet Sauvignon, but you drive a Prius and drink La Croix? If so, hanging out with your friends could be damaging to your wealth. Trying to keep up with your neighbors financially is a fool’s errand. Focus on your finances, not theirs. Who cares if your neighbor has a bigger boat?
  • I don’t need a financial plan. Have you tried taking a road trip without a GPS? Have you ever been lost on a mountain trail without a map? If you’ve ever planned a family vacation, you know the benefit of a solid plan. A financial plan will help you quantify and prioritize your goals. It will be your guide and travel companion.

Facts matter, especially when it comes to investing. Investment truth for success: Invest early, invest often, think long-term, keep you your fees low and create a financial plan.

The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity.” ~  Abraham Lincoln (source: the Internet)

May 30, 2019

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA® is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation.

[1] Financial Peace University

[2] Determinants of Portfolio Performance, Financial Analyst Journal, July/August 1986, Vol 42, No. 4, 6 pages; Gary P. Brinson, L. Randolph Hood, Gilbert L. Beebower.

Measure Twice, Cut Once.

I love DIY projects.

This past weekend I was going to fix my garage door. I researched the issue, watched a few YouTube videos and talked to some professionals. I felt confident I could fix it, so I ordered the supplies.

The project was going well until I started to add the new part. It wasn’t working. I reviewed the instructions, but no luck. Frustrated, I gave up after an hour and went back to the drawing board. After my review, I figured out that the part I had ordered was 1/16th of an inch too big, so I ordered another replacement part. When it arrived, I completed the project in less than ten minutes. A friend of mine once told me with the right tools you can fix anything. He was right.

The primary tool for an investor is the financial plan. It will give you a blueprint on how best to construct, or fix, your financial life. There isn’t a good plan or a bad plan, there’s only your plan. It will give you a picture of your current financial situation. How does it look? Are you on track to reach your financial goals? Do you need to make any adjustments? Will your fix be a tweak or a major overhaul?

Like a construction project, a financial plan can appear daunting. Here are a few suggestions to help you get started.

Take an inventory of your financial assets. Where are they located? Do you own stocks, bonds or mutual funds? Do you have a 401(k) or company retirement plan? If so, gather all your statements and put them in an investment folder.

Gather your important documents like tax returns, insurance policies, and Social Security statements. Put these items in your important documents folder.

Identify your income. In addition to your job, do you generate income from other sources? Royalties? Rental Income? Pension? Print your paystubs, W-2s and 1099s and put them in your income folder.

Create a budget or spending plan. Where is your money going? The best way to create a budget is to review your past six months of bank and credit card statements. Write down your expenses and then create categories like housing, shopping, groceries, entertainment, and so on. Once you’ve gathered this data, put it in your budget folder.

Do you have debt? Do you have a mortgage? Car loan? Student loan? Credit card debt? Print out all your statements that identify your debt levels, payments, balances and interest rates. After this is done, put your statements in a debt obligations folder.

Establish your goals. Do you want to travel the world? Buy a second home? Volunteer? Retire early? Start a new business? Leave a bequest? Write them down, all of them. Dream big. Once this is done put your list in a goals folder.

List your concerns. Are you worried about your finances? Are you concerned about running out of money? Market losses? Dying early? Living too long? After you write down your concerns and fears, put them in your concerns folder.

Once your exercise is complete you should have several folders identifying your assets, goals, and concerns. You now have the foundation for your financial plan. Schedule a meeting with your advisor or planner to hand over all your folders. They will review the data and build your plan. Simple.

You now have a financial plan to help guide you toward achieving your goals. I know you can do it!

Hammer away!

Real men don’t use instructions, son. Besides, this is just a manufacturer’s opinion on how to put this together. ~ Tim Allen

May 29, 2019

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA® is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do Investment Returns Matter?

The S&P 500 rose 13% in the first quarter.  Are you satisfied or frustrated if your investment portfolio “only” made 12%?

During the quarterly review season investors want to know how well their accounts performed. Did they make money? Did they outperform the market? Will the trend continue? These are common, and logical, questions investors ask their advisors – but are they the right ones to ask?

Of course, returns matter. However, rather than focusing solely on your investment returns, you should review your financial goals and savings target. Are you saving money? Are you investing for a purpose? Do you have written financial goals? If you aren’t saving any money, your returns won’t matter. Nor will they matter if you’re not investing for a purpose like buying a new home, saving for retirement, or funding an education.

Identifying your investment goals is paramount to determining if you’re on the right track. For example, if your goal is to retire with $1 million and your current account balance is $1.2 million, you don’t need to take aggressive risks with your money. A conservative mix of investments will help you grow and preserve your wealth. On the other hand, if your balance is $250,000, you’ll need to own a growth-oriented portfolio loaded with quality stocks.

Time is also a factor. A 25-year old who saves $500 per month needs to earn 6% per year to reach $1 million in assets by age 65. A 50-year old needs to earn 25% – an unrealistic rate of return.

Investment goals and time frames are linked. Will you need your money in one year or less? If so, invest in short-term investments like U.S. T-Bills, money market funds, or CDs. These low-yielding investments will underperform stocks over time, but your goal is not to generate the highest return because you’ll need the money in the near term.

Saving for college is also time dependent – 18 years or less. If you recently had a baby, then an all-stock portfolio makes sense. As your child approaches age 18, move the assets to safer investments. When my daughter was born her account was filled with individual stocks. When she entered college, I moved half her assets to U.S. T-Bills so I could pay for her tuition, rent and food. She’s graduating from college in December and this strategy worked well.

Retirement is a primary goal for most. Saving as much as possible for your retirement is recommended. You’re allowed to contribute $19,000 per year to your 401(k). If you’re 50 or older, you can add another $6,000. You can also contribute $6,000 to an IRA. You can contribute another $1,000 if you’re 50 or older

During your next quarterly review, focus on your goals rather than your returns. Here are a few suggestions to help you transition from returns to goals.

  • Establish goals. If you don’t have a target, you can’t measure your progress. Once you document your financial goals, you’ll know if you’re on track – or not. Set up a system to monitor your progress. You can create a savings thermometer like you see at fund raising events! If you’re on track, stay the course. If not, make the necessary adjustments.
  • Increase your savings. You can’t control the stock market and returns are fleeting, but you can control how much money you save. In 2017 the S&P 500 rose 21.8%. It fell 4.4% last year. Let’s return to our 25-year old investor. She needs to earn 6% per year to reach $1 million at age 65 if she saves $500 per month. If she increases her monthly savings to $1,000, she only needs to earn 3.32%.
  • Control your spending. To retire, you need to cover your expenses. The lower your expenses, the less money you’ll need to save for retirement. For example, if your annual expenses are $100,000, you’ll need at least $2.5 million to pay for your expenses. If you can lower them to $75,000, then the amount you’ll need to save is $1.875 million. Do you track your expenses? Creating a spending goal or budget plan will help you establish your asset target. Multiply your expenses by 25 to figure out how much money you’ll need for retirement. Are you on track?
  • Adjust your asset allocation. An allocation to 100% stocks will give you the best opportunity to create long-term wealth, but it will be a bumpy ride. In 2008 the S&P 500 fell 37%. A portfolio consisting of 50% stocks and 50% bonds fell 20%. Adding bonds to an all equity portfolio will reduce your risk. What is your appropriate asset allocation? It depends on your tolerance for risk, financial goals, and time horizon. You can click on this link to identify your risk tolerance: https://clients.riskalyze.com/risk-questionnaire/questionnaire-intro
  • Big wins. The largest investment in your account will have the biggest impact on your returns. My parents best performing stock has been Starbuck’s, it’s also their smallest position. It has little impact on their account. Denmark’s stock market has outperformed the U.S. market by 4% per year for the past 20 years. Denmark accounts for 1% of the global market capitalization while the U.S. accounts for 54%.[1] When U.S. stocks move it makes an impact, not so much with Denmark.

It’s important to generate positive long-term returns, but it’s more important to have financial goals. Take some time to identify your goals so at your next quarterly review meeting you can focus on your progress.

Risk comes from not knowing what you’re doing. ~ Warren Buffett

May 9, 2019

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA® is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation.

[1] Dimensional 2019 Matrix Book

Latte Wars

A high-profile financial battle is brewing over coffee. Suze Orman has said that a daily coffee habit can cost you $1 million.[1] Her comments were called into question by Ben Carlson, blogger at “A Wealth of Common Sense.” He said, “This advice sounds good because the latte factor is catchy but it’s not useful advice.”[2]

Coffee, and other household items have long been at the center of the wealth debate. Financial professionals have encouraged clients to reduce their expenses by eliminating fast food, alcohol, cigarettes, donuts, etc. Reducing your expenses to improve your financial health is always recommended. However, eliminating these items from your daily routine will have a larger impact on your physical health than it will on your financial health.

Let’s ground up some numbers to find out if it makes sense to eliminate coffee from your budget.

Today, a cup of coffee costs about $2.50. If you work for forty years (25 to 65), you’d spend about $41,000 on coffee.

The average starting salary for college graduates is about $50,000. During a 40-year career they might earn $3.3 million.[3]  Their coffee habit will cost them 1.2% of their lifetime income.

How does this expense compare to other household items? According to the recent Consumer Expenditure Survey, the average household income is about $60,000. Housing is the biggest expense at 33% of income, or $19,884 per year. Food is next at 20%, followed by 15.9% for transportation. Healthcare is 8.2%. Entertainment is 5.3%.[4]

Consumers spend about 1.4% of their income on fruits and vegetables, about the same amount as they spend on coffee.  Should you eliminate fruits and vegetables from your diet to create wealth?

What if you ditched your coffee habit and invested the money in the stock market? A monthly coffee habit costs $50 ($2.50 x 20).  Investing $50 per month into Vanguard’s S&P 500 index fund (VFINX) from April 1979 to April 2019 would have grown to $1.14 million. The fund has generated an average annual return of 11.33% for the past 40 years.[5]

Of course, your numbers may differ, so here are a few ideas to help you with your spending habits.

  • Develop a budget or spending plan. Mint.com and other websites can help you improve your budgeting results. After taking stock of your revenue streams and expenses, identify items to reduce or eliminate. Look to big ticket items like housing, transportation or healthcare to make major changes to your budget.
  • Establish an emergency fund. Your emergency fund will help pay for unexpected expenses. Your fund balance should equal 3 to 6 months of your household expenses. It can be invested conservatively in a money market fund, savings account, CD, or T-Bill.
  • Invest for growth. Owning stocks for the long-haul is a great way to increase your wealth. Stocks have generated an average annual return of 10% since 1926 while U.S. T-Bills have returned 3.4%. A dollar invested in stocks is now worth $7,025. The same dollar invested in T-Bills grew to $21.[6] An investor of stocks can drink all the coffee they want!
  • Buy what you know. Peter Lynch, the former portfolio manager for the Fidelity Magellan fund, suggested investors buy what they understand. If you’re a coffee drinker, then Starbuck’s is an obvious investment choice. A $10,000 investment in Starbuck’s in June 1992 is now worth $2.6 million.[7] A quick inventory of the products in your house can be the foundation for a solid investment portfolio. Do you own any Apple products?
  • Review your spending and investment accounts. Reviewing your financial data daily, monthly, annually, or as needed is recommended to make sure you’re on the right path. At a minimum, it should be done annually.

It’s okay to spend money on things you enjoy so long as they don’t bust your budget. Living within your means is the preferred way to increase your wealth and enjoy the fruits of your labor, so drink and invest wisely!

As a note, Starbuck’s is adding a S’mores Frappuccino® this month. I’m not a coffee drinker, but I will purchase their S’mores drink because I want to and it’s in my budget!

I put instant coffee in a microwave oven and almost went back in time. ~ Steven Wright

 

May 2, 2019

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA® is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation. The investments highlighted are for informational purposes only and not recommendation to buy or sell. I’m not a coffee drinker, so my coffee expense numbers may be low.

 

 

[1] https://www.cnbc.com/2019/03/28/suze-orman-spending-money-on-coffee-is-like-throwing-1-million-down-the-drain.html, Emmie Martin, March 28, 2019.

[2] https://awealthofcommonsense.com/2019/04/the-stephen-a-smiths-of-personal-finance/, Ben Carlson, April 16, 2019

[3] https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/15/college-grads-expect-to-earn-60000-in-their-first-job—-few-do.html, Abigail Hess, February 17, 2019

[4] https://www.bls.gov/opub/reports/consumer-expenditures/2017/home.htm, website accessed 5/2/2019.

[5] Morningstar Office Hypothetical Tool, website accessed 5/2/2019

[6] Dimensional Matrix Book 2019. Historical Returns Data – US Dollars.

[7] Morningstar Office Hypothetical Tool, website accessed 5/2/2019

My Canoe Trip

I recently took an overnight canoe trip with some mighty men from my church – a diverse group of weekend warriors brought together for adventure and fellowship.

We paddled down the Colorado River. The river was running faster than normal due to the rain we received in Austin, so it produced some exciting moments. One team tried to row under some low hanging branches. It didn’t go well, and they were both thrown from their canoe. One individual floated down the river for about a mile or two before we reached our lunch spot and he could rejoin his canoe and partner.

Our team leader was extremely organized, so it made our trip even more enjoyable. His spreadsheets included detailed lists for packing, eating, and driving. His planning was key to our success. At the drop-in spot we loaded our canoes to the gunnels with firewood, tents, fly rods, footballs, frisbees, and steaks. Once on the water, we paddled to our little island.

My partner and I arrived at the island first. We pulled into a little cove, beached our canoe, and explored the island. We decided to set up camp near our landing spot. We pitched our tents, found a spot for our camp fire, and helped the other paddlers get to shore.

A canoe trip can teach us much about investing. Here are a few lessons I learned while on the water.

  • To move forward, you need to put your oar in the water. To grow your wealth, you need to own stocks. The stock market, like a river, can be turbulent at times, but if you stay the course your assets will grow over time. Buying and holding stocks for the long haul is a better strategy than trying to time the market by darting in and out of your holdings.
  • Planning is the key to a successful investment strategy. Our event succeeded because our team leader dedicated many hours to planning our trip before our boats touched the water. Likewise, a financial plan will help guide you to your financial destination. Your plan is a collection of your hopes, dreams and fears. It will be the cornerstone for your investment portfolio.
  • Team work is key. My canoe mate and I paddled in unison, working as one to arrive at the island. Had we paddled independently, we would’ve gone in circles and floated aimlessly down the river. Working with a team of advisors can keep you focused on your goals. Your team may include a CPA, attorney, banker, mortgage broker, insurance agent, or financial planner. These professionals offer specialized services to help you grow and protect your wealth.
  • Going with the flow is much easier than rowing against the current. When we landed at the head of the island we decided to stop and explore. If we had kept paddling to find a better spot, we would have missed the island completely and we would’ve had to paddle against the current to get back to our original spot – a tough thing to do. It pays to stop occasionally to review your investment portfolio and financial plan to make sure you’re still on track to reach your goals. It’s easier to review and correct your account periodically than it is to wait every few years to check your status. If your plan is still on track, stay the course. If not, make the appropriate adjustments.
  • The right tools make all the difference. We had a plethora of handy gadgets to make our stay more enjoyable, including the Inferno infrared steak cooker! The right tools can make your financial life easier as well. A trust, a will, a financial plan, and insurance policies are needed to fortify your foundation. In addition, investing in low-cost funds will put more money in your pocket.

As you map your financial journey, spend some time planning your route and work with advisors who can help guide you to your destination.

So, point your bow down river and start paddling!

 

Jesus answered, “Everyone who drinks this water will be thirsty again, but whoever drinks the water I give them will never thirst. Indeed, the water I give them will become in them a spring of water welling up to eternal life.” ~ John 4:13-14

April 30, 2019

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA® is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ than those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation.