How to Survive a Stock Market Correction

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was less than 500 points away from touching 30,000 before the Coronaviraus arrived and spooked investors. In less than two weeks, the Dow Jones has fallen almost 13%, and it appears the selling will continue until a vaccine arrives, hopefully soon. As the market climbed higher, bears were calling for a correction and they finally got their wish. Stock market corrections are common, and they occur about every three to five years. A bear market lasts approximately 18 months, while a bull market will run for about eight years.[1]

How can you protect yourself against a bear market attack? Here are a few suggestions.

  1. Don’t panic! A market drop is normal, painful, but normal.
  2. Don’t make any changes to your portfolio during the initial phase of a market correction. Let the market find its footing before you make any significant changes to your investments.
  3. Cash is king. If you have a cash cushion, you’re less likely to make rash decisions regarding your stock holdings. How much cash is enough?  My recommendation is for you to hold three to six months of expenses in cash. If your monthly expenses are $10,000, then your cash account should be $30,000 to $60,000.
  4. Invest in U.S. T-Bills if you’re nearing retirement. A suggested amount is three years’ worth of expenses. If your annual expenses are $100,000, invest $300,000. The safety of T-Bills will allow you to survive a typical correction. If you invested in October 2007, you could have lived off your T-Bills for three years while waiting for the Great Recession to end. The Great Recession lasted from 2007 to 2009, where stocks fell 53%, so your bonds allowed your stocks to recover.
  5. Diversify your assets. A balanced portfolio of stocks, bonds, and cash will help cushion the blow from a market drop. During a market drop, your bonds will perform well.  During the 2008 market selloff, long-term U.S. government bonds rose 25.9%.[2]
  6. Rebalance your portfolio. You will sell appreciated investments to buy depressed ones, or buy low and sell high. If you rebalance your portfolio, you can take advantage of lower stock prices. Rebalancing allows you to keep your risk level and asset allocation in check.
  7. Eliminate your margin balance. A sure way to lose more money than you intended is to use leverage.  If you use margin to buy securities, I would encourage you to eliminate it. The best way to make a bad situation worse is to employ excessive margin in a down market.
  8. Stay invested. The two days following the stock market crash of October 19, 1987, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 16%. Despite the dramatic drop on Black Monday, the Dow ended 1987 in positive territory, and it has since risen 1,380%, including the recent selloff.[3]
  9. Look for bargains. Is your favorite stock now 25% cheaper? If you’re not sure what to purchase, buy a broad-based index fund.
  10. Think long term. A bear market lasts about 18 months. You may own your investments for years, maybe decades, before you need the money, so think generationally to help you get through the dark days of a market downturn.
  11. Markets recover. The stock market has always recovered! It may take time, but they eventually rebound.
  12. Have fun. The market will go up, down, and sideways long after we’re gone. Instead of worrying about the daily moves in the stock market, get outside, and enjoy your friends, family, and hobbies while you wait for stocks to bounce back.

Stock market corrections come and go. The market is a long-term wealth creation machine occasionally disrupted with short-term pullbacks. If you apply these ideas, you may have an opportunity to benefit from the long-term performance of the stock market.

Even though I walk through the darkest valley, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me.  ~ Psalm 23:4.

February 27, 2020

Bill Parrott, CFP®, is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose. Our firm does not have an asset or fee minimum, and we work with anybody who needs financial help regardless of age, income, or asset level. PWM’s custodian is TD Ameritrade, and our annual fee starts at .5% of your assets and drops depending on the level of your assets.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ from those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation. Options involve risk and aren’t suitable for every investor.

 

 

[1] https://www.forbes.com/sites/robertlenzner/2015/01/02/bull-markets-last-five-times-longer-than-bear-markets/#12745f772dd5, Robert Lenzer, January 2, 2015, site accessed 3/10/17.

[2] Dimensional Fund Advisors 2016 Matrix Book.

[3] YCharts. DJIA – October 19, 1987 to February 27, 2020.

A 1% World

Interest rates continue to fall. U.S. Treasury investments with maturities from one month to thirty years are now yielding below 2% as investors pursue safety. The Coronavirus is generating global economic uncertainty, and our government bonds are benefiting.

The ability to generate current income from bonds is challenging. In year’s past, you could rely on a steady stream of income from bonds to meet your needs. Bond interest, plus Social Security were usually enough for individuals to enjoy a comfortable retirement. In 1990, the yield on the 30-Year U.S. Treasury bond was 8%. If you needed $100,000 in income, you purchased $1.25 million worth of bonds. Today, you need $5.26 million, or four times as much. If rates drop to 1%, you’ll need $10 million to receive $100,000 in income!

With Interest rates at historic lows, where can you find income? Here are a few strategies you can employ today.

Dividend-Paying Stocks. Currently, 2,304 stocks are yielding more than a 30-year U.S. Treasury bond at 1.9%.[1] Johnson & Johnson, Intel, Coca-Cola, The Home Depot, Merck, McDonald’s, Pepsi, Lockheed Martin, Qualcomm, Target, Walgreens, and Clorox are some names on this list. Who knows what interest rates and the stock market will do over the next few days, but I’m confident the prices for most of these names will be higher in 30 years.

Systematic Withdrawal Plan: If you own mutual funds, a systematic withdrawal plan (SWP) allows you to generate monthly, quarterly, or annual income from your existing holdings. For example, if you invested $100,000 in the Vanguard S&P 500 Index Fund (VFINX) in 1980, 40 years ago, and withdrew 4% of the account balance each year, you received over $1 million in payments, and your account balance is now worth more than $1.5 million! In 1980, the income generated from this strategy was $4,000; this year, it will produce $62,956, an increase of 1,473%.[2]

Option Writing.  Writing options or selling calls on stocks you own is a great way to produce more income. Let’s say you own 1,000 shares of ABC company trading for $37 per share. If you want to sell your shares at $40, you can use a covered call strategy. A hypothetical option expiring in April may cost $1. You can write ten call contracts on your ABC holding because one contract equals 100 shares of stock. One thousand shares, or ten contracts, at $1 will generate $1,000 before fees and commissions. The $1,000 will credit your account when the trade is complete.  If ABC stock closes at $40 or higher on the April expiration, you must sell your stock at $40 regardless of how high it trades above your strike price. If ABC stock closes below $40 at expiration, you keep your shares, and you can write another ten contracts for May or June.[3]

Fixed Annuity. Normally, I’m not a fan of annuities, but desperate times call for drastic measures. A fixed annuity allows you to receive monthly income for a certain period, or the rest of your life. The annuity will enable you to receive the income generated from the investments, similar to a bond, or you can annuitize your investment and receive a guaranteed payout for life.  When you annuitize, you won’t be able to make any changes to your income stream. However, it will help you avoid longevity risk or the risk of outliving your money. An annuity is an insurance product, so your fees will be higher than most other products.

It’s tempting to chase rates, but do not be lured into a product offering an extremely high level of interest. A high yield may signal trouble with the underlying investment. Instead, as you hunt for yield, look for an investment that produces a consistent stream of income without taking on too much risk.

If you don’t find a way to make money while you sleep, you will work until you die. ~ Warren Buffett

February 24, 2020.

Bill Parrott, CFP®, is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose. Our firm does not have an asset or fee minimum, and we work with anybody who needs financial help regardless of age, income, or asset level. PWM’s custodian is TD Ameritrade, and our annual fee starts at .5% of your assets and drops depending on the level of your assets.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ from those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation. Options involve risk and aren’t suitable for every investor.

 

 

 

[1] YCharts

[2] Morningstar Office Hypothetical Tool, 01/01/1980 to 1/31/2020.  Your rate of return may vary and your results may differ. The hypothetical does not include fees or taxes which will adjust the results.

[3] Options involve risk and are not suitable for every investor.

A Billion Dollars A Year

How would you spend a billion dollars? Would you create a foundation? Would you run for President? Would you try to send a rocket to Mars? Would you purchase priceless art?

The top five hedge fund managers last year earned more than a billion dollars in salary, with an average pay of $1.48 billion. A group of fifteen hedge fund managers made more than $12 billion.[1] Hedge fund managers typically charge a 2% fee on your investment and take 20% of your profits as compensation. The S&P 500 rose 29% last year, without fees. If you invested $10,000,000 in a hedge fund and your account appreciated 29%, your manager’s compensation would have been approximately $780,000, or 7.8% of your original investment.

Last year was a phenomenal year for major asset classes, so your hedge fund manager should be compensated well for his (the top five hedge fund managers are all men) efforts. How did they perform? The five hedge fund managers, as a group, generated an average return of 24.6%, before fees.  The best of this elite group returned 41%, the worst returned 14%.[2]

On a gross basis, the top five underperformed the S&P 500 by 4.4%. Two of the five outperformed the index, and only one bettered it on a net basis. If the average return was 24.6% and their fee was 7.8%, then the net gain was 16.8%. Last year, several low-cost ETFs performed well: Real Estate returned 24.4%, Utilities 21.3%, Small Caps 21%, International Stocks 18.1%, Gold 17.9%, and Emerging Markets 16.7%.[3] An equal weighting of these ETF’s returned 19.9%.

Fees matter when it comes to investing because you can only spend net returns. How do you know what fees you’re paying? Here are a few suggestions.

  • Every publicly traded investment has a ticker symbol, and if you plug it into Yahoo! Finance, Morningstar, or any other financial site, you’ll be able to see the fees associated with your investment. Every Mutual Fund and Exchange Traded Fund has an operating expense ratio (OER). For example, the OER for Vanguard’s S&P 500 Index Fund (VOO) is .03% or $3 per $10,000 invested.
  • Registered Investment Advisors must file their Form ADV each year. The ADV outlines an advisor’s fee schedule, assets under management, and other vital information. If you work with an advisor, they’ll provide you with their form.
  • Broker sold insurance items, and other packaged products are delivered with a prospectus. The prospectus summarizes the fee schedule, including sales charges, surrender fees, 12b-1 fees, and additional fees.
  • Brokerage firms post their commission rates and schedule online.
  • Conduct a fee audit with your advisor. Your advisor should be able to review your investment holdings, account fees, and other charges to help you get a better handle on your costs.

Registered Investment Advisors must disclose their fees to you before you invest, brokers should do the same. If you’re not sure what fees you’re paying, ask. It’s your money. I’ve noticed firms that charge high fees say they’re adding value to their clients. If you’re working with one of these firms, ask them how they’re adding value. If they can’t explain it to you, maybe it’s time to hire a new advisor.

One of the best ways to add value to your bottom line is to work with a Certified Financial Planner™ who invests your money in a globally diversified portfolio of low-cost funds and offers financial planning.

Give to everyone what you owe them: If you owe taxes, pay taxes; if revenue, then revenue; if respect, then respect; if honor, then honor. ~ Romans 13:7

February 17, 2020.

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA®, is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose. Our firm does not have an asset or fee minimum, and we work with anybody who needs financial help regardless of age, income, or asset level. PWM’s custodian is TD Ameritrade, and our annual fee starts at .5% of your assets and drops depending on the level of your assets.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ from those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation. Options involve risk and aren’t suitable for every investor.

[1] https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/hedge-fund-managers-earned-more-than-billion-last-year-highest-2020-2-1028894639, by Ben Wick, February 11, 2020

[2] Ibid

[3] YCharts: VNQ, VPU, IJR, EFA, GLD, & VWO 2019.

China and Emerging Markets

China is closed. The world’s second-largest economy is shut down due to the Coronavirus, and life is at a standstill. According to several news reports, the number of deaths from the virus has now surpassed the number of deaths from SARS – a frightening thought, and the uncertainty is making the situation worse.

China’s idleness will have, at some point, an impact on global economies and stock markets. The Chinese stock market is down .5% for the year, but this can change quickly.

Emerging markets and China are linked. Chinese stocks are 33% of the MSCI Emerging Market Index, so when China moves, so does the index. The index invests across five regions, 26 countries, and 1,100 securities.[1] Dimensional Funds, Fidelity, and Oppenheimer manage sizeable emerging market mutual funds, while Vanguard, Blackrock, and Schwab have substantial assets in their exchange-traded funds. The top holdings for most of these funds include Alibaba, Tencent, Taiwan Semiconductor, and PingAn Insurance Group.

The Matthews China Investor Fund (MCHFX) has produced an average annual return of 11.51% for the past twenty years, and it has a current asset allocation of 95% stocks, 5% cash. Most of their assets, 89%, are invested in Asian emerging markets.

Chinese stocks account for 3% of the global equity market capitalization, the same level as France and Canada.[2]  We recommend an allocation of 5% to emerging markets, so if Chinese stocks account for 33% of the index, our exposure to China is 1.65%. If Chinese stocks fall, the index will too. However, I’m willing to commit 1.65% of capital to the world’s second-largest economy.

During the AIDS epidemic from 1987 to 1995, the emerging markets index fell 6.7%, Chinese stocks dropped 40%, and the S&P 500 rose 34.9%.

Emerging markets rose 13.8% during the Bird Flu outbreak from 1997 to 2004. Chinese stocks plunged 65.6%, the S&P 500 rose 63.6%.

The emerging markets index rose 122% during the SARS epidemic from 2002 to 2005, while Chinese stocks climbed 74%, and the S&P 500 index grew 8.7%.

During the Swine Flu outbreak from 2009 to 2010, emerging markets soared 103.1%, Chinese stocks increased by 62.5%, and the S&P 500 was up 39.2%.

The Ebola outbreak occurred from 2013 to 2016. During this outbreak, emerging markets fell by 18.2%, Chinese stocks dropped 6.8%, and the S&P 500 rose 57%.

The United States stock market is massive, efficient, and developed, but it’s not immune to extended periods of poor performance. During the ‘70s, a 10,000 investment grew to $11,570, generating an average annual return of 1.47%. If you invested $10,000 in the S&P 500 on January 1, 2000, you had to wait thirteen years before you were profitable. But, if you held on to your original $10,000 investment from 1970, it’s now worth $357,820, producing an average annual return of 7.35%.[3]  For the past two decades, the S&P 500 and MSCI Emerging Markets Index produced similar returns.

Emerging markets have always been volatile – a feast or famine mentality. In 2006, Chinese stocks rose 82.9%. in 2008, they fell by 50.8%. Turkey rose 253% in 1999, and fell 45.8% in 2000, 32.8% in 2001, and 35.8% in 2002.[4] Volatility is the central theme for investors in emerging markets.

Does it make sense to sell all your emerging market holdings? My recommendation is to stay committed to this sector. Another reason to remain long emerging markets is demographics. China, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, Brazil, Russia, and Mexico account for 49% of the world’s population – and growing![5]

Rather than selling your emerging market stocks, invest in a globally diversified portfolio of low-cost funds, investing in an assortment of stocks and bonds based on your financial goals and time horizon.

What should you do if emerging markets fall? Buy more!

Nevertheless, I will bring health and healing to it; I will heal my people and will let them enjoy abundant peace and security. ~ Jeremiah 33:6 

February 10, 2020.

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA®, is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose. Our firm does not have an asset or fee minimum, and we work with anybody who needs financial help regardless of age, income, or asset level. PWM’s custodian is TD Ameritrade, and our annual fee starts at .5% of your assets and drops depending on the level of your assets.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ from those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation. Options involve risk and aren’t suitable for every investor.

 

 

 

[1] https://www.msci.com/emerging-markets

[2] Dimensional Fund Advisors 2019 Matrix Book

[3] YCharts.

[4] Dimensional Fund Advisors 2019 Matrix Book

[5] https://www.internetworldstats.com/stats8.htm

I Missed Tesla

Tesla’s stock performance has been electrifying, rising 20% yesterday, 15% today, and 86% for the year. Since June, it’s soared 415%. On August 7, 2018, Elon Musk tweeted, “Am considering taking Tesla private at $420. Funding secured.”[1] Tesla’s stock is up 142% from this now infamous tweet.

Initially, I missed several “obvious” winners over the past three decades, like Apple, Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and so on. I did, however, eventually buy these stocks. In 1993 I purchased DELL Computer in my IRA and quickly doubled my money. After it doubled, I sold it so I wouldn’t lose my profit. DELL would rise another 20,000% or so over the next several years, a valuable lesson to let your winners run.

I’m not worried I missed Tesla, because I own it indirectly through several funds. Who knows what’s ahead for Tesla, but if it follows the path of previous highfliers, I may get another opportunity to buy it at a lower price. When I started in the business as a stockbroker, I recommended Coca Cola stock to clients, despite the fact it went public in 1919, 71 years before I started. Coke stock has risen over 1,000% since January of 1990[2], so investors still made money despite its strong performance during the previous seven decades.

Missing a winning stock doesn’t cause me any regret because I’ve also passed on losers like Enron, Worldcom, Global Crossing, Gamestop, and several others. In a diversified portfolio of individual stocks, you’ll probably own a few winners, a few losers, and numerous also-rans. A winning stock like Amazon or Tesla can have a significant impact on your portfolio. A losing stock, likewise, will be an anchor, dragging your performance down.

Tesla is a popular stock, getting most of the headlines and screen time on CNBC, but other stocks are performing better this year. Nanoviricides is up 331%, LMP Automotive Holdings Inc is up 114%, and Interups is up 110%.[3] Owning mutual funds will give you exposure to companies not on your radar screen.

What should you do if you’ve missed a highflying stock that everybody else appears to own? Here are a few suggestions.

  • Be patient. What goes up will come down. Amazon stock fell 92% in 2001 and 60% in 2008. Apple fell 85% in 1985, 82% in 1997, 79% in 2003, and 56% in 2008. Facebook fell 54% in 2012 and 38% in 2018.[4] Stocks fluctuate and oscillate between over and undervalued.
  • Buy fewer shares. If your goal is to buy 100 shares, start with 50 or 25.
  • Buy a fixed dollar amount. Rather than focusing on shares, start with dollars. A prudent allocation is 3% to 5% of your account balance.
  • Set a limit. Enter a buy-limit to purchase the stock at a specific price. You can set any price you want, but you must buy the stock if it trades at or below your limit price; however, you’re not guaranteed to get the stock at the price you set.
  • Sell a put option. Selling a put option obligates you to buy shares at a specific price. Because you’re a seller, you’ll collect a premium. The premium is yours to keep, regardless of what happens to the price of the stock. For example, Tesla’s April 2020 $500 put option is currently selling for $6.75, meaning, for every contract you sell, you’ll collect $675, before fees. One option contract equals 100 shares of stock, so if you sold one contract at $500, you’re obligated to buy it at that price if the stock trades at or below the strike price when the contract expires in April – 100 shares of Tesla at $500 is a $50,000 purchase. If you’re going to pursue this strategy, please work with an advisor who understands option trading, because options involve risk, and they’re not suitable for every investor.
  • Buy a mutual fund. The following mutual funds own shares of Tesla: Baron Partners (BPTUX), Harbor Capital Appreciation (HRCAX), Vanguard Extended Market (VEXMX) and Invesco QQQ Trust (QQQ)

Chasing a high-flying stock is a risky proposition, so develop a trading plan and tread lightly. Don’t over commit capital and avoid leverage. Be patient, and work your plan.

“The trick is not to learn to trust your gut feelings, but rather to discipline yourself to ignore them. Stand by your stocks as long as the fundamental story of the company hasn’t changed.” ~ Peter Lynch

February 4, 2020.

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA®, is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose. Our firm does not have an asset or fee minimum, and we work with anybody who needs financial help regardless of age, income, or asset level. PWM’s custodian is TD Ameritrade, and our annual fee starts at .5% of your assets and drops depending on the level of your assets.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ from those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation. Options involve risk and aren’t suitable for every investor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1] https://www.cnbc.com/2019/08/08/teslas-chaotic-year-after-musks-funding-secured-tweet.html, By Michael Wayland, August 8, 2019.

[2] YCharts: January 1, 1990 – February 3, 2020.

[3] YCharts

[4] Ibid

A Flight to Safety

This decade is off to a tough start. The Coronavirus is disrupting global trade, travel, markets, and economies. The 2020 U.S. Presidential election will also add to the uncertainty and confusion. With increasing risk, should you buy, sell, or hold your existing investments?

When forecasts are dire, and projections are bleak, selling your stock positions and moving to cash makes sense. It seems prudent to sell your investments and park the money in a bank until the storm passes, and, when it does, you can repurchase your stocks.

Let’s say, for fun, you invested $1 million in the S&P 500 in 2005 – 100% of your assets. After three years, your strategy paid off. Your account at the end of 2007 is worth $1.172 million, a gain of 17.2%![1]

Here’s where it gets interesting because, we now know, 2008 was a horrible year for the S&P 500. If you decided to hold, you lost 38.3%. Your original investment of $1 million is now worth $747,392, a loss of 25.2%.

With hindsight, you would have sold your investment on December 31, 2007, to lock in your gains. If you sold, you would’ve been a hero, admired for having the foresight and courage to sell after three years of substantial profits. However, it’s unlikely you would’ve moved from cash to stocks in January of 2009 because we were in the midst of the Great Recession. You probably would have waited two or three more years to get back in the market, missing a 40.5% return. If you reinvested in January 2009, you made 23.6% for the year. If you had the conviction to buy the dip in 2008 and 2009, you made even more when stocks recovered.

If you ignored the bear market and held your stocks during the correction of 2008, you made $2.76 million from 2005 to the year-end of 2019, an increase of 227%. Now that your account balance is $2.76 million, what should you do -sell or hold? If you sell, you’ll pay a capital gains tax of 20%, or $455,243 – a significant number. If you hold, you may encounter another stock market correction. A repeat of 2008 would mean a loss of $1.25 million, but still above your original investment of $1 million.

It’s impossible to time the market, but they’re a few strategies you can employ to protect your assets. The first is to diversify your holdings to include different asset classes like small companies, international stocks, and bonds. A globally diversified portfolio of mutual funds would have lost 20.3% in 2008, not great, but better than a loss of 38%. True, you give up some upside, but you protect your assets to the downside. A balanced portfolio of 60% stocks, 40% bonds generated an average annual return of 6.5% since 2005. Your $1 million investment grew to $2.48 million.[2]

More stock means more risk, but it also means more reward. Buy and hold investors have been rewarded for their patience, and, hopefully, this time will not be different.  If you want to find out the risk exposure in your portfolio, give us a call.

“Go out on a limb. That’s where the fruit is.” — Jimmy Carter

February 3, 2020.

Bill Parrott, CFP®, CKA®, is the President and CEO of Parrott Wealth Management located in Austin, Texas. Parrott Wealth Management is a fee-only, fiduciary, registered investment advisor firm. Our goal is to remove complexity, confusion, and worry from the investment and financial planning process so our clients can pursue a life of purpose. Our firm does not have an asset or fee minimum, and we work with anybody who needs financial help regardless of age, income, or asset level. PWM’s custodian is TD Ameritrade, and our annual fee starts at .5% of your assets and drops depending on the level of your assets.

Note: Investments are not guaranteed and do involve risk. Your returns may differ from those posted in this blog. PWM is not a tax advisor, nor do we give tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for items that are specific to your situation. Options involve risk and aren’t suitable for every investor.

 

 

[1] YCharts – IVV, 1/1/2005 to 12/31/2019.

[2] Morningstar Office Hypothetical